Category Archives: Natural news and common thought

It’s the Ice, Stupid — Open Mind

Earlier this month the WUWT blog treated us to a bizarre post about how this year didn’t set a new record for lowest Arctic sea ice extent (it only came in 2nd-lowest), in spite of “two very strong storms.” Doubling down, they offer another post trumpeting “record Arctic sea ice growth in September.” Which makes […]

via It’s the Ice, Stupid — Open Mind

The Scarborough Subway Fiasco

Political agendas given priority. Planning and policy, contaminated by false/tweaked data, changing costs, and ever-changing opinions. Expert advice, best practices, and even approved funding – cancelled and/or ignored.

This is Toronto – namely the TTC, the planners, and the politicians, today.

A $2-3 billion price tag, perhaps even more, for a 1-stop subway extension, that almost nobody sees of value, carrying passengers with LRT density levels, at best.

The world has a right to laugh. Even when we’re handed a silver platter of funds/plans/partners, to get transit right, we screw it up.

Metrolinx, please take over, end this political circus – and get us moving!

Steve Munro

For the benefit of out-of-town readers who may not follow the moment-to-moment upheavals in Toronto politics, the lastest news about the Scarborough Subway is that it will cost $900 million more than originally forecast, and the Eglinton East LRT line has gone up by $600 million.

Updated 10:45pm June 17: The increase in the Eglinton LRT line’s cost may only be $100m, not $600m. Awaiting further details to confirm this.

No details of the components of these increases have been published yet, but here are the current (as of 6:45 pm on June 17) media reports:

  • The Star: Mayor John Tory accused of ‘political posturing’ as Scarborough transit plans balloon by $1 billion
  • The Globe & Mail: Scarborough subway cost rises by $900-million
  • Torontoist: The Bad Decision on the Scarborough Subway Extension Gets Worse

Earlier this year, the much-touted “optimized” plan for Scarborough changed the subway scheme…

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Earth Day 2016 – hope for the future?

It’s Earth Day friends – time to celebrate, reflect, and move forward on how we can take ever-stronger care of this planet!

That means supporting our neighbours, building sustainable communities, transforming our energy systems, and advocating for strong climate leadership at all levels of government, in how we live/work/play. Some even say to drop the “Earth Day” label entirely, as it does more harm than good… might be worth considering:

To celebrate, I was planning to share some awesome events you can take part in over the coming days… but when I checked my favourite sites for Mississauga, there wasn’t much happening! The events I did find are sold out (a promising sign), so I was quite surprised… I’d love for those reading this to share any public events in Mississauga they know about, on this topic, in the comments below. If you live somewhere else, please share local opportunities with your friends, too! The more action we take, the better!

To reflect, I encourage you to watch the video from the Paris Agreement Signing event, below, while thinking about what each of us can do in our own lives to tread lightly, respectfully, more aware and informed, on this Earth. Leonardo doesn’t mince words, despite the promise the Paris Agreement holds – we have a LOT of work yet to do. Ask yourself – what changes can I make to help my kids, and their kids, have the same quality of life as me? What do I need to be happy – can I change it, to also be sustainable? For me, it means working to ensure I waste as little as possible in everything I consume, while learning about climate change issues and solutions through research and conversation, and volunteering in my community for projects that deliver healthier air, soil, and water.

Finally, on moving forward… now is a great time to join the conversation on sustainability! Learn about all your local community leaders, whether they are from government, industry, NGO’s, or academia. Learn from them, work with them to foster solutions, advocate for strong policy/regulation, a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy, and inspire greater involvement in the movement to tackle climate change locally and abroad. Another crucial element is to learn about where we came from (sustainability in history, solutions in the past) and where we are, today (do we respect the land we live on, are we learning about indigenous history, decolonization, and reconciliation?). If you need resources on any of these topics, start a conversation!

Some great organizations in Mississauga to work/learn with: (+ the sub-page “green“)

Remember, above anything else – you are NEVER alone in the shift towards sustainability! It is a hard, at times stressful battle, but you can always reach out to me, your friends, colleagues, and community leaders, part of the movement of millions working to restore our climate to a more balanced state.

We can do this, we are the majority.

Earth Day is every day…so we don’t need the label to define us, direct us, or hold us back!

Be in the know on the LEAP Manifesto

There has been quite a bit of noise this past week over The LEAP Manifesto, since the media coverage of the Federal NDP Convention, and the subsequent divisions that came from the decision they made. But what’s the conversation really about? Why are some hugely in favour, and others hugely opposed, to this document?

An excellent Q&A was shared with me recently from the creators of this project, and I wanted to share it with you, too – it has been edited for length, below.

To be clear, the Manifesto is a non-partisan project, as much as some would love to claim it as a left-wing pet project – that simply isn’t the case.

So take a look at the Q&A and see if it helps your understanding, it certainly helped me keep an open mind. The goals for a cleaner future, where everyone has access to stable, equitable, environmentally sustainable jobs sounds pretty good to me!

1. So… what just happened? 

On Sunday April 10th 2016, Canada’s New Democratic Party passed a resolution to discuss and debate The Leap Manifesto in riding associations across the country in the lead-up to their 2018 policy convention.

The NDP convention took place in the oil-producing province of Alberta, where at least 75,000 workers have lost their jobs since the oil price crash of 2015. Alberta elected an NDP majority government last May for the first time in the province’s history; that government is trying to diversify the economy, weather a recession, and has introduced an historic climate action plan… but is still vigorously calling for new tar sands pipelines.

Because The Leap Manifesto states: “There is no longer an excuse for building new infrastructure projects that lock us into increased extraction decades into the future”, the idea of the federal NDP debating and potentially adopting this proposition set off a corporate media frenzy.

2. Is this really all about shutting down the Alberta tar sands tomorrow, killing Alberta jobs and tanking the Canadian economy? That’s what I’ve been reading.  

The document does not call for an immediate end to fossil fuel production in Canada, nor does it call for anyone to be thrown out of work. It’s a vision of an economy based on “caring for the earth and each other” – a call for a transition beyond fossil fuels, in which the people worst-affected by fossil fuel development (including indigenous communities and laid-off oil workers) are first to benefit from the clean jobs of the next economy.

By signing the Paris climate accord, our new federal government has committed to a clean energy transition in Canada.  In line with the global consensus on climate science and echoing longstanding calls from Indigenous land defenders and others, The Leap Manifesto does make a demand of no new fossil fuel infrastructure as the country begins its transition to a renewable energy economy.  

So will investing in renewables instead of pipelines tank the economy? Investments in renewables create 6-8 times more jobs than those in the fossil fuel industry.  Around the world, clean energy is now seeing twice as much investment as fossil fuels — the shift is happening so fast that infrastructure based around fossil fuels built today are at risk of becoming stranded assets.

“…the world has reached a turning point, and is now adding more power capacity from renewables every year than from coal, natural gas, and oil combined.” – Bloomberg News, Solar and Wind Just Did the Unthinkable. Jan 14 2016

Researchers at Stanford University have mapped out how Canada can get to a 100% clean energy economy by 2050, and create hundreds of thousands of jobs in the process.  A cross-country Canadian research project has also mapped out how Canada can shift its entire electrical grid to clean energy by 2035.

3. Is The Leap Manifesto the only group in Canada that opposes new pipelines?  

The opposition to new pipelines in Canada has been led by the Indigenous communities whose land those proposed pipelines would cross over without their consent, and whose ability to live off the land would be most impacted by oil spills. Public sentiment against pipelines is also particularly strong in both British Columbia and Quebec.

Opposition to new pipelines is not an extreme position in Canada. And energy insiders are now making the case that with the low price of oil, the economics of new tar sands pipelines don’t make sense any more. Beyond all that, the climate science on new pipelines is clear: Canada can’t build them and meet the carbon emissions commitments we made in Paris in December.

4. Was The Leap Manifesto written by those latte-swilling downtown Toronto socialists Naomi Klein and Avi Lewis?

The Leap Manifesto came out of a meeting (yes, held in Toronto) that brought together dozens of social-movement activists from six provinces: Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, B.C. and Alberta. It is a consensus statement – literally written by committee – that reflects a common vision from across a spectrum of different causes. It launched with the support of respected Canadians that support a range of political parties, and organizations as diverse as Oxfam, Black Lives Matter-Toronto, No One Is Illegal-Coast Salish Territories, Idle No More, CUPE, CUPW and the Council of Canadians  What makes The Leap Manifesto different than other environmental statements is the unprecedented coalition behind it.  You can see all the initiating signatories and organizations here.

5. So is The Leap Manifesto an NDP thing now?  What if I don’t support the NDP?

The Leap Manifesto is a non-partisan project and always will be.  As we wrote in this statement, the Greens and other parties endorsed the document months before the NDP passed this resolution, and the Liberals have made strides in advancing some of the document’s key demands since they took office.  The Leap Manifesto is and will always be a non-partisan project, with supporters from every political party, and some who support none.

6. I heard The Leap Manifesto calls for an end to all animal agriculture.  I don’t remember reading that in the document — did you add it after I signed?

No! This is from a vegan spoof site that started up after the Leap launched, and has now been unhelpfully referenced in the Alberta legislature.  On agriculture, The Leap Manifesto states:

Moving to a far more localized and ecologically-based agricultural system would reduce reliance on fossil fuels, capture carbon in the soil, and absorb sudden shocks in the global supply – as well as produce healthier and more affordable food for everyone. 

… a position which, if implemented as policy, would strengthen our local agricultural  production and food security.  Please help us get the word out about this.

7. What happens now?

This is the beginning of a larger conversation about the speed of Canada’s transition to a renewable economy, and how it intersects with Indigenous rights, retraining for workers, and community priorities.

While the debate that exploded this week is in some ways worrisome – dredging up old frames of jobs vs the environment, and pitting workers against climate action – we welcome the opening of this conversation in the public sphere. We hope to see The Leap Manifesto inspire more debate – but most importantly, actions at all levels of government, in the business world and at a community level, to make the shift to a clean energy Canada based on caring for the earth and one other.

Please share your thoughts – what do you like, and what could be improved?

Five Articles Worth Sharing:

Why the ruckus over the Leap Manifesto?
Linda McQuaig, Toronto Star

Let’s get real about the Leap Manifesto: it’s not a job killer.
Charlie Smith, Georgia Straight

Sorry, pundits of Canada. The Leap will bring us together.
Avi Lewis, Globe & Mail

Dear Leap Manifesto critics: there will be no jobs on a dead planet.
Gary Engler, National Observer

Clean disruption? Stanford group plans for 100% green-energy future.

Youth aren’t apathetic.

The proof is in the numbers…

Youth are trying hard to engage in the political process, right across Canada.

Now, the political process must engage with us.

Some more numbers:

Stay engaged, find your local community. Nurture it, and it will nurture you.


Photo source:

Celebrating winter along the Humber

It was forecast, but the extreme warmth since Friday and spring-like rain last night caught me off-guard. Less than 30 cm of snow this entire winter (25% of normal) in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and the 10 cm we had managed to accumulate, purged, in just one day.

And so, the very literal “week of winter” that graced the GTA – and which I did my best to celebrate and share, has come to an abrupt – and dangerous – end.

Why dangerous? Creeks and rivers will flood; ice – at least where it managed to form – will jam; birds and insects are returning and emerging, yet, even if this warmth continues, killing frosts and cold will still sweep in, causing confusion, lack of resources and, ultimately, ecological damage.

It’s not just the birds and the bees, a chaotic climate system, and the volatile weather that comes with it, leaves none unscathed…
farms get soaked and flooded, pests and disease can survive better and start reproducing sooner and the risk of budding fruit trees and vines dying later by frost increases, too
-infrastructure costs spiral, as pulses of salt water, combined with night-time freeze-thaw cycles, erode, corrode and crack pipes, roads and bridges
-snow recreation goes bust, while any other recreation, even using a trail, becomes icy, muddy and inaccessible, all at once

As you might be wondering based on the title of this post, there’s one more thing! Before I let you go on such a serious note, enjoy some from the last day of this winter week, celebrated, this past Thursday. I hope you had a chance to celebrate this brief spell of winter, too! More than anything, I hope, so much, that we don’t forget the past – if we lose sight of what “seasonal” and “normal” is, and why a stable climate is so important, we’ll never realize what we lost, or what we could have had… We’ll just be sitting like a frog in a pot of boiling water, awaiting an easily avoidable fate.

‪#‎winterlove‬ ‪#‎climatereality‬ ‪#‎endangeredseason‬
and, once more, back to #‎winterlessGTA‬…

A Winter Hike at Erindale Park

Another day of wonderful winter weather, another hike, this time with a focus one particular hill! Explore my friends wonderful blog for photos and rich detail on this adventure! ‪
#‎sledding‬ ‪#‎wetandcold‬ ‪#‎worthit‬

I really hope I get to see such winter weather again this month! Get and enjoy the beauty of nature, whatever the season and weather is for you – it’s the best stress-reliever and idea-generator there is! ‪
#‎naturepower‬ ‪#getoutside #‎winterlove‬

A dose of science a day keeps the apathy away, so check out this research from the U.S. on changing snowfall!…/winters-becoming-more-rainy… (Great site for climate news!)

I hope Canada, as we revive our scientific leadership, unmuzzle scientists, restore funding and unleash the potential of our researchers, will add more perspective on our changing climate here, too – particularly in the Arctic.
#endangered #season

Dreams and Illusions

A soft blanket of white covered the land, glistening under the sun’s rays. The snow looked thick  but crumbled easily under our feet as my cousin and I trudged through to meet our fellow hiker. Our fellow hiker, Rahul Mehta, was very knowledgable about the area. He informed us that the Erindale Park, through which we were now strolling, was once a landfill that had been repurposed into a park after the closing of the landfill. The tobogganing hill to which we were headed was the last cap over the landfill. The tobogganing hill was surrounded by pine trees frosted with snow, and some straggling and bare deciduous trees. The view from the top was spectacular!


Rahul pulled out his cardboard while my cousin and I prepared our plastic bags to sail down the hill. The feeling of drifting down was great even though the ride was slow. But our luck was about to…

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