Ottawa’s urban Inuit renaissance

winterseeker:

A strong community, connected to their roots – the culture, language, food and history – is one fundamentally connected closer to the planet, and in turn, the environment.

What a beautiful story. We should all strive to support such vibrant communities that are happy, strong and proud, while also stewards of a planet that needs a lot of help right now…

Originally posted on Ottawa Citizen:

On her first day of school in the south, Lynda Brown and her mother were called in to see the principal, who told them it wasn’t appropriate to send a child to school in “slippers.”

Lynda looked down at the sealskin kamiks and the parka she was wearing — similar to clothing that had kept her ancestors warm in the Arctic for centuries — then looked at the other children at her Edmonton elementary school. No one needed to tell her she didn’t fit in. So at six years old she decided that being Inuit was nothing to be proud of and starting telling other children she was Chinese “because it was more accepted.”

Now 40, Brown is one of the faces of an urban Inuit movement that is embracing culture and traditions — even adapting some new ones.

She found her lost Inuit heritage, she says, in Ottawa.

“This is where I learned everything. I didn’t speak the…

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